Guest Post: Serenity in Chaos – an India Tour by Bernard Cohen

I’ve been fortunate to have had amazing opportunities to travel the world. I am fascinated and curious about the things man builds and the reasons he builds them.

I have seen and marveled at the Eiffel Tower in Paris, the great pyramids of Egypt, the Great Wall of China, Tiger’s Nest Monastery in Bhutan, Angkor Wat in Cambodia and finally the Taj Mahal in India.

The Taj is said to have been built as a monument to love.  But when we arrived at the site it was quite crowded and  difficult to ponder without hundreds of people in my line of sight.  So, I looked down, in the reflecting pool, and there was the vision of serenity that I shot.

The Taj Mahal by Bernard Cohen

Bernard in Bhutan

Bernard Cohen is a wealth management advisor in Palm Beach, Florida.  He enjoys traveling with his wife Susan and spending time with his grown children and grandchildren.

We’ve been honored to have Bernard and Susan travel with us on two luxury group tours to Asia: Treasures of India and Bhutan: Inside the Dragon Kingdom, and hope to have them travel with us again soon!

National Geographic: India’s Grassland Kingdom

 

© Photograph by Steve Winter, National Geographic

 

100 tigers, 2,000 one-horned rhinos, 1,800 wild buffalo … Kaziranga National Park is India’s Grassland Kingdom

By Douglas Chadwick
Photograph by Steve Winter

Fewer than 200 were left in the north Indian state of Assam a century ago. Agriculture had taken over most of the fertile river valleys that the species depends on, and the survivors were under relentless assault by trophy hunters and poachers. Kaziranga was set aside in 1908 primarily to save the rhinos. It held maybe a dozen. But the reserve was expanded over the years, given national park status in 1974, and named a World Heritage site in 1985. During the late 1990s it grew again, doubling in size (although legal issues remain to be settled). Now Asia’s premier rhino sanctuary and a reservoir for seeding other reserves, Kaziranga is the key to R. unicornis’s future.

A thundering conservation success story, the park also harbors almost 1,300 wild elephants; 1,800 Asiatic wild water buffalo, the largest remaining population anywhere; perhaps 9,000 hog deer; 800 barasinghs, or swamp deer (it’s a main enclave of this vanishing species); scores of elk-like sambars; and hundreds of wild hogs. Read more…

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Guest Post: Travel in Colour by Claude Renault

 

Neeja sitting in front of her home in Neemrana, Rajasthan. Claude Renault © All rights reserved

 

My first trip to India was in 1984, to the north. In 1999, I returned for three months to South India, which turned out to be quite different from what I had seen during my earlier visit. I fell in love with India while in Hampi, where I was drawn to the more traditional way of life. Hampi’s rural setting reminded me of aspects of my upbringing. I grew up in a village in Brittany, France and can still remember the easygoing pace of life there. It was similar in Hampi.

Since 1999, I have been back to India every year, sometimes twice a year, and it’s becoming very difficult to go elsewhere. The country has become part of me. Not a day passes without me reading something about it or listening to Indian music. It’s almost an obsession, albeit a gentle one.

As I studied painting and sculpture at art school, I drew more inspiration from painters than photographers. In my photographs, color fills the background whenever possible.

Each time I return to India, I experiment with something new. It can be meeting Indians on the ghats (sandstone steps leading to the river) in Varanasi, spending time with sadhus (Hindu holy men), sharing days with hijras (people belonging to a traditional transgender subculture) or attending a colorful festival like the Sonepur Mela in Bihar. I love photographing daily life, but never wanted to indulge in the sordid—a trap you can easily fall into in India. I deliberately choose to show the brighter side of the country. What I want to capture is a moment of intense emotion, the movement and the color, without being abstract.

 

 

Asia Transpacific Journeys India Photo Contest Semifinalist, Claude Renault © All rights reserved

 

It seems like everybody in India has some kind of knowledge on how to mix colors together—it can be a hut, a tiny shop or a wall. I started shooting in black and white, but nowadays I wouldn’t dream of going back to that. Life is color, and India is full of it. It has an energy you don’t find elsewhere in the world.

Traveling and shooting in India each year gives me strength to live in Europe the rest of the time. I believe I would have real problems if, for one reason or another, I couldn’t go back to India. I must say, I have thought about settling permanently in India a few times. I would love to.

Although Claude Renault obtained a degree in sculpture from Ecole des Beaux-Arts, France, his interest in photography flourished after graduating. A self-taught photographer, Renault began his career working as a corporate photographer before going freelance in 1994. In recent years, traveling to India has been his greatest inspiration. His passion for documenting the soul and color of India through his lens is evident in every photo. Renault was a semi-finalist in our 2010 India Photo Contest.